CPAWS Soirée - An evening with Robert Bateman and Ian Tamblyn

Join CPAWS Ottawa Valley (CPAWS-OV) and special guests Robert Bateman and Ian Tamblyn for an evening of art and music in support of wilderness conservation.

Overview

The evening will be a wonderful celebration of the connection between art and nature. Enjoy an intimate discussion with Canadian naturalist and artist Robert Bateman, as he shares his thoughts with us on the history, diversity, and natural wonder of our country.The evening will also feature the music of local musician, playwright and adventurer Ian Tamblyn (more on our featured guests below).

This not to be missed event takes place on Monday, October 23, 2017 at the Moore Farm Estate in Gatineau. The Moore Farm is a beautifully restored heritage building surrounded by community gardens on a 35-hectare rural estate and features a bistro-boutique within.

Stunning artwork created at the CPAWS-OV Dumoine River Art Camp will also be showcased and available for auction. In August CPAWS-OV hosted the art camp, which brought together artists working in different mediums and from communities across Eastern Ontario and Western Quebec. The artists had an opportunity to explore the Dumoine River, create various works of art, share stories and become inspired by this magnificent landscape. Their art will be displayed at Art Brûlant and Impressions in Shawville, Quebec from October 7-21, 2017 and can also be viewed on our website.

Guests will receive a complimentary signature cocktail upon entry, and enjoy fine finger foods locally sourced and created at the Moore Farm. Cash bar also available. Doors open at 6:30pm, come enjoy the space before the evening begins at 7:00pm with a welcome and opening prayer by Algonquin Elder Claudette Commanda.

This event will sell out, don’t wait! Tickets are $60 each, purchase your tickets here.

Our special guests are passionate about the environment and protecting nature for future generations.

Robert Bateman has been a keen artist and naturalist from his early days and is now one of the foremost artists depicting the world of nature. Bateman’s art reflects his commitment to ecology and preservation; he has become a spokesman for many environmental and preservation issues. He is currently on tour promoting his newest book, Robert Bateman’s Canada. www.robertbateman.ca

Ian Tamblyn is a local musician, songwriter, playwright and adventurer. Tamblyn’s extensive career began in 1972 and has since released 38 albums, acted as producer for dozens of other artists, written fourteen plays and over one hundred theatre soundtracks. www.tamblyn.com

Claudette Commanda is an Algonquin Anishinabe from Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation. She has dedicated the last 30 years promoting First Nations people, history, culture and rights in various capacities as a University of Ottawa student, professor, member and chair of the aboriginal education council; and in the public forum via speaking events.

Proceeds from our CPAWS Soiree - An evening with Robert Bateman and Ian Tamblyn will support CPAWS-OV's wilderness conservation efforts including protecting Quebec's Dumoine, Noire and Coulonge rivers and securing legislated protection for Gatineau Park. 

See you there!


Art Work for Auction

Aleta Karstad

Grande Chutes

Oil Painting
Market Value: Not for sale

Please note, that due to extenuating circumstances, Aleta Karstad’s donated painting could not be displayed at this time. This is a sample of her work, however it is not for sale. Please attend our CPAWS Soirée on October 23, 2017 at the Moore Farm to see the donated piece. Her piece will also be visible on our website, once it is obtained.

Born in Guelph, Ontario in 1951, Aleta learned her love of nature through helping her wildlife pathologist father, Lars Karstad, with travels and field work. She began work in biological illustration at the National Museum of Canada, and in 1973, married biologist Frederick W. Schueler. Aleta writes, draws, and paints outdoors, as the most direct way of communicating the essence of a time and place. Her mission is to teach people to love and learn about the land and its inhabitants. Aleta Karstad and her husband Fred Schueler are active members of the Ontario Road Ecology Group, South Nation Conservation Fish & Wildlife Committee, the Ontario Rivers Alliance, the Canadian Herpetological Society, and the Ottawa Field-Naturalists Conservation Committee. Fred and Aleta have been residents of Bishops Mills, Ontario since 1978. When they're not keeping track of local natural history, they're on art & science expeditions elsewhere in Ontario, or anywhere from the Maritimes to BC.

 

Phil Chadwick

#1959 Morning on the Grande Chute

Oil Painting
Market Value: $600

Grande Chute on the Dumoine is about 25 kilometres along the access road from Swisha. It is a very impressive series of ledges and falls and is definitely not canoeable. A Class 1 rapid is located at the outlet of Grande Chute. The volume of water surging down the chute in spring is such that all of these features are buried beneath the flood of water.

Aleta guided me to the eastern shore of Grande Chute just down from the bridge. Claire drew nearby but the black flies and mosquitoes tormented her so much that she had to leave for a less sheltered vista. Aleta, Vic and Lynne painted on the next outcrop just to the south.

I painted on the very edge of a rocky outcrop that stretched out above the rapids. My view was looking southwest and downstream along the torrent. My goal was to be quickly honest to all of the tones, textures and colours of Grande Chute. The desire was that the raw energy of the current would find its way into the oils. The sound was deafening. I needed my bug suit on or the whine of the mosquitoes would have been distracting competition to the roar of the rapid. My glasses were packed safely away as I did not wish to see every little detail.

The splash of blue among the trees on the west bank of Grande Chute was really there. It was all that I could see of the tent from a group camping at the Ravine. If I had been wearing my glasses I might have been able to discern some more details but that is undesirable while painting en plein air. They packed up their gear as I painted. I would visit the Ravine and my new favourite swimming hole located there, a couple of days later. The rapids were full of motion and I try to include that kind of energy in my art as well.

Apparently the Grande Chute Bridge was threatened during the floods of 2017. The structure withstood the torrents with the waters rising to within a couple of feet below the bottom of the bridge.

The CPAWS Art Camp is an attempt through creativity to further protect the Dumoine and to enlarge the wildlife corridor. As they say "Art is long, life is short." Seneca the Younger (c. 4 BC – AD 65). Perhaps this art will live and inspire longer than any of the artists and make a difference in protecting this watershed and perhaps others as well.

Oils on dark burnt sienna oil tinted foundation on commercial canvas - 11 X 14 (inches) Started 10:00 am Thursday August 3rd, 2017 on the eastern bank of Grande Chute very near N46.378022 W77.771908.

Website:  www.chadwick.homestead.com and www.philtheforecaster.blogspot.ca


Becky Mason

Dumoine Glowing Heart

Acrylic
Market Value: $750

What drives me in my work is the exploration of colour, texture, movement and moods. My process allows me to plumb the inner depth of my subject matter “Mother Earth.” My paintings unfold from my mind’s eye using the paper creases as my pathway. As an artist and environmentalist I seek answers underneath the deceptively ordered surface of our natural world.

Becky Mason acquired her paddling skills and her fondness for canoes from her father, Bill Mason. She continues the family tradition of sharing her passion for canoeing through her canoeing courses, art and film making. In the year 2000 and 2001, she produced two award winning videos a basic and advanced Classic Solo Canoeing, profiling her course and her love of paddling. Becky has also travelled the country presenting her beautiful and captivating slide shows and she has contributed to many books on canoeing including a piece for the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society book “Rendezvous with the Wild, The Boreal Forest”.

A native of Chelsea Quebec, Becky Mason is a professional visual artist and has participated in a wide array of exhibitions at galleries in Ontario iand Quebec since 1988. Her artwork and information on the Classic Solo Canoeing program and video can be found on her website: www. redcanoes.ca

Website: www.redcanoes.ca

 

Bruce Winterbon

#1414 Grande Chute from East Side

Photography
Market Value: $90

Bruce Winterbon is an artist and artisan.  When Bruce is not in his workshop turning wood, he spends time in his own woodlot recreating, taking photos, and collecting wood for making art. He hopes to share ideas and gain inspiration from the Dumoine River and the other artists participating in the camp.


Lynette Chubb

Don Smith Memorial Inuk

Acrylic with mixed media
Market Value: $65

Born in Baie Comeau, Quebec Lynette is an avid paddler and has travelled much of the Canadian Wilderness. Lynette’s art takes huge inspiration from her time on the rivers and in the woods.
"I am continually delighted at the way our ever-changing natural lighting conditions keep revealing new subtleties in my transparent paintings. Each piece looks so different from hour to hour!"
Lynette is both a Professional Artist, a certified Paddle Canada Moving Water Instructor and holds current WFR & WRT qualifications.
Website: www.acrylart.ca
 

Lynette Chubb

Grand Chute du Moine

Acrylic with mixed media
Market Value: $250

Born in Baie Comeau, Quebec Lynette is an avid paddler and has travelled much of the Canadian Wilderness. Lynette’s art takes huge inspiration from her time on the rivers and in the woods.
"I am continually delighted at the way our ever-changing natural lighting conditions keep revealing new subtleties in my transparent paintings. Each piece looks so different from hour to hour!"
Lynette is both a Professional Artist, a certified Paddle Canada Moving Water Instructor and holds current WFR & WRT qualifications.
Website: www.acrylart.ca

 

Lynette Chubb

Vague du Moine

Glass Mirror with Mixed Media
Market Value: $335

Born in Baie Comeau, Quebec Lynette is an avid paddler and has travelled much of the Canadian Wilderness. Lynette’s art takes huge inspiration from her time on the rivers and in the woods.
"I am continually delighted at the way our ever-changing natural lighting conditions keep revealing new subtleties in my transparent paintings. Each piece looks so different from hour to hour!"
Lynette is both a Professional Artist, a certified Paddle Canada Moving Water Instructor and holds current WFR & WRT qualifications.
Website: www.acrylart.ca

Cynthia O’Brien

Earth Layers

Photograph and Clay
Market Value: $450

My time on the Dumoine River was a great experience. CPAWS-OV gave time and support to artists to explore and figure out what “tickled our fancy”, for my part, I got lost in the wonders of the woods.

Based on finding Umbilicaria Muchlenbergii (Plated Rock Tripe) on the rocks next to the Dumoine River, I recreated this lichen and added them to the living growth, in situ.  The installation lasted as long as the weather would allow, melting away in the next rainfall. 

This is now the photo background to fired sculptural lichen.  Like the earth layer upon layer…...a layer of rock, layer of living lichen, layer of clay lichen, layer of photo, layer of clay (rock) lichen again.

Website: www.cynthiaobrien.ca

 

Angela St. Jean

La grande chute, rivière Dumoine

Acrylic
Market Value: $345

I'm a plein air landscape painter born and raised in the Ottawa Valley. I live and work in this beautiful area and feel nothing but gratitude for our natural spaces. I feel like my purpose as an artist is to share that on canvas and somehow influence how you the viewer might see and experience nature as a result. My summers spent in the Pontiac growing up, my deep rooted French ancestry, my love of this place I call home and my long time dream of experiencing more of our area with other artists are but a few reasons why I would be so blessed to participate in this opportunity. I have travelled to BC several times for artistic workshops, painting by ship, on mountain tops, by canoe, and have found that the artist communities are key in protecting and promoting the natural spaces there. I feel I have a deep calling to be part of something like this in my own community.
Website: www.angelastjean.com

 

Tina Michaud

Dumoine Trail

Indian Ink
Market Value: $ 180

Tina Michaud owns the gallery Gallerie Gallera in Swisha Quebec. Tina teaches art and has her own gallery and studio on the Ottawa River which provides a space for artists to pursue their art while developing their skills. Tina has drawn for most of her life and has taken innumerable art courses. While in Montreal, she studied mixed media and studio art as well as drawing at Concordia University.
Surrounded by water and wilderness, her locale gives artists the peace of mind to explore, paint, and create in this lush, clean, natural environment. It is the ideal place for individuals and groups to get lost in their creativity. This unspoiled region clears the mind and frees your imagination to soar!
Website: www.thatcanadianlodge.ca/artgallery.htm

 

 

Eva Gallagher

Hear the Rapids Roar

Clay
Market Value: $200

Hiking along the banks of Grande Chute one cannot but be inspired by the power and majesty of the roaring water – a show of force that has continued to churn along the rock-strewn channel for millennia after the retreat of the glaciers.
What did the first aboriginal travellers think thousands of years ago as they made their way up the Dumoine and heard the roar of the rapids? Did this force of nature inspire awe, was it a show of spiritual power, with the “Creator” issuing a physical challenge to the travellers?  What about the missionaries, fur traders and lumbermen who followed them? Did it also bring about a tinge of fear that a misstep could lead to disaster? Listen – maybe you can hear the distant cries of those who lost their lives to the grasping eddies.
Today it is the recreational tourist who listens and hears the rapids roar.  Long after we are gone may the Dumoine continue to awe and inspire all those who come after us.
Website: www.newfoundoutpotter.blogspot.ca

 

Mary Gourlay

Rock Shelf, Dumoine River

Oil Painting
Market Value: $540

Scottish born, educated in Sweden and the UK.  Travelled and worked as freelance private secretary for extensive periods in Europe and South Africa before settling in Canada in 1992.
I’m attracted to the rugged landscape of the Canadian Shield, particularly its rivers. I enjoy the challenge of painting the awesome tumult around bedrock and boulders. The Art Camp offers me a great opportunity to paint further into the wilderness of the Shield. I am very keen to have the opportunity to participate; to support a cause that I truly believe in through my art would be most rewarding. I look forward to all the social interaction with other creative people who also have conservation on their minds.


Cassandra Robillard

Tiny Faces of the Dumoine River: Ptilidium pulcherrimum in 3 views

Ink and Graphite
Market Value: $300

What amazed me about the Dumoine was the sheer diversity of tiny, unassuming plants and fungi that call this misty forest their home. One of these tiny plants is an old friend of mine: Ptilidium pulcherrimum (sometimes called Tree Fringewort) is a leafy liverwort that is beautiful in its intricate complexity. On first glance, you will see it as a creeping, suede-like blanket on rotting logs or trees bases. Up close, you see the individual furry shoots, each crawling branch ending in a lobed, rounded tip like a cat’s paw. The reason for the furry appearance becomes clear under a microscope: each tiny leaf (only one cell thick and about 1mm wide) is deeply lobed and fringed with long cilia only one cell wide. This species is a testament to the increasing beauty to be found, the closer we look at the world around us.

This piece was made by sketching specimens of Ptilidium pulcherrimum under microscopes with the aid of a camera lucida. The sketches were reproduced by hand in their final arrangement on the page and then inked, with shading accents in pencil.


Vic Dohar

La Grande Chute, Rivière Dumoine

Watercolour
Market Value: $500

It was a privilege being selected as an artist to participate in CPAWS’ Dumoine River art camp, and it was enjoyable being among other artists and nature enthusiasts. This was my first time exploring the Dumoine River after hearing so much about it prior to this event, about its beauty and untamed ruggedness. During the art camp, we experienced many a downpour, so typical of the past summer, and might I add very challenging for a watercolourist! One of the goals of my watercolours is for the viewer to have a sense of connection, a feeling of “being there”. I hope that my painting achieves this and conveys to the viewer the power and beauty of the Dumoine River at La Grande Chute. 
Website: www.vicdohar.com

 

Lynne Bedbrook

White Water 1

Oil Painting
Market Value: $700

“All the power that ever was or will be is here now”

My work celebrates the Sacred Laws:
Let nothing be done to harm the Children.
Everywhere is sacred ground.

The Mineral children, the Plant,  the Animal and Human children are this sacred livingness.  The dynamic interplay of livingness and feeling is a multi-level story that shapes patterns in movement.

The Dumoine River is a pristine, rugged, artery transporting the heartbeat of life force through our Canadian Shield seeding CPAWS' intent for a wildlife corridor. Let’s do everything we can to further this view.

These paintings intend to be doorways into a rich world of mystery, kindness, compassion and respect for our powerful landscape and her inhabitants.

I feel this fierce connection to the wind, earth, fire and water resonates with the wild magic residing within each of us.

I have formally taught Awareness Through Movement ® (Feldenkrais Practitioner) for over 25 years. Movement and Art are part of the Great Mystery.

Lynne Bedbrook is a painter whose soul is inhabited by these wild landscapes. She lives and paints among the animals in the Gatineau hills.

Website: www.lynnebedbrook.com


Lynne Bedbrook

White Water 2

Oil Painting
Market Value: $600

“All the power that ever was or will be is here now”

My work celebrates the Sacred Laws:
Let nothing be done to harm the Children.
Everywhere is sacred ground.

The Mineral children, the Plant,  the Animal and Human children are this sacred livingness.  The dynamic interplay of livingness and feeling is a multi-level story that shapes patterns in movement.

The Dumoine River is a pristine, rugged, artery transporting the heartbeat of life force through our Canadian Shield seeding CPAWS' intent for a wildlife corridor. Let’s do everything we can to further this view.

These paintings intend to be doorways into a rich world of mystery, kindness, compassion and respect for our powerful landscape and her inhabitants.

I feel this fierce connection to the wind, earth, fire and water resonates with the wild magic residing within each of us.

I have formally taught Awareness Through Movement ® (Feldenkrais Practitioner) for over 25 years. Movement and Art are part of the Great Mystery.

Lynne Bedbrook is a painter whose soul is inhabited by these wild landscapes. She lives and paints among the animals in the Gatineau hills.

Website: www.lynnebedbrook.com

 

Clare Brebner

Forest Floor

Mixed Media
Market Value: $300

During my time at the Dumoine River Art Camp, I met not only artists, but scientists. While I thought I would spend most of my time looking out at the water, and up at the treetops, I instead found myself looking down at the rich tapestry fo the forest floor. Mosses, toads, pawprints, ferns, lichens - these were some of the minutiae that were being studied, collected, and measured by the scientists at camp. The more I looked at them, the more I discovered about these tiny worlds below our feet.Forest FloorThe colourful, poisonous mushroom featured in my painting was one of many beautiful specimens I came across while looking down. Moss abounds around it, and despite its colourful warning, it still provided a snack to some creature (possibly a slug). It is one small part of the story of the forest floor, of life supported by the Dumoine River.

Clare Brebner is an Ottawa-based visual artist who works primarily in illustration, photography, and printmaking. She received her BFA from the University of Ottawa with a focus in photography and video, and has shown work in Canada and the United States. Clare is also an art instructor, providing both classes and individual tutoring.
Website: www.clarebrebner.com

 

Scott Haig

End of the Day - The Sun Going Down on a River Going Down

Photography
Market Value: $300

This image was captured a few minutes before sunset on August 3, 2017. The location i sthe Grand Chute of the Dumoien River, which flows south into the Ottawa River just west of Rapides-des-Joachims, Quebec.
I spent several hours scouting the shoreline, looking for the best location to capture the energy and excitement of this dramatic series of rapids and waterfalls. The spot that seemed to offer the best perspective was this one, a huge boulder jutting out into the stream. It offered a view of white water to the right and to the left, and provided the ideal angle to view the cascade all the way to the bottom, about two kilometers away. A large hill in the distance sloping left to right provides dynamic counterpoint to the treeline in the middle distance, sloping right to left. Other elements provide a harmonious symphony of attractions to the eye: from the cleft in the rock and the adjacent shrub pointing downstream, to the strand of trees backlit by the sun in the otherwise dark forest on the right side, and the golden froth swirling in the blue-black waters of the deeper channels.

In making the print, I strove for the natural colour balance that matched my recollection of the vibrant light that was bathing the scene at the time. To recapture the delicate interplay between the soft golds of the sunset and the still vibrant blues of the sky and the greens of the brightly lit forest on the left, this print should be illuminated by bright white “studio” (cool, o r full spectrum) lighting from above, or by diffuse sunlight from a nearby window, preferably on the north side of the building.

However, in looking for the ideal spot to hang this print in my own home, I noticed an interesting phenomenon, which occurs more dramatically with this photograph than with any other I have ever captured and printed. This photo changes mood with changes in light just as the original scene did as the sun set! Placed in a room with only moderate incandescent, or otherwise “warm” lighting, the sunset becomes more advanced, and the print looks as the Chute did about ten minutes after sunset. Reduced the light further, by turning out most of the lights, and looking at the print by the light of the adjacent hall, and it will resemble the falls at the edge of night, about an hour after sunset. And turn out all the light but for a dim light coming from the next room, and the photo will appear as the falls would by the light of the setting moon, not sun, or even as the scene would appear by the glow of nothing but the canopy of stars.

If you are the successful bidder on this piece, you might want to consider illuminating it with track lighting on a dimmer, so that you can observe these changes most easily. No matter how you choose to display it, I wish you many years of enjoyment in viewing this print, and hope that you can journey to the Dumoine yourself to view this magnificent place in person.